Author Topic: Lavos' Impact  (Read 6640 times)

GrayLensman

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2006, 11:35:23 pm »
Has anyone noticed that while Lavs is approaching the earth, it's sprite has the appearance of a ball, with no mouthparts visible.  Lavos may have assumed this form for protection while it travelled through space and impacted the planet.  In Lavos's later metamorphosis, its exposed mouthparts made it vulnerable to attack.

Zaperking

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2006, 08:58:52 am »
I'm just going to add that if Lavos' crash was as powerful as the KE meteor that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, then the humans would be dead too. I remember reading a documentary that said that the blast wave obliterated half the world, and the creatures on the other side of the world from where the blast took place suffered even worse. In CT, Ioka didn't even suffer from an Earthquake. Lavos probably hit the surface of the Reptites castle thingy, and then entered into the pocket dimension. The reason for the change in climate may result to the debrie being clouded above, and because Lavos is draining the life of the planet. I would believe that Lavos starts sucking up the energy faster, and by 12,000 BC, he's slowing down with it, and that is why the ice is starting to melt etc, ready for 1000AD.

AuraTwilight

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #17 on: July 09, 2006, 03:09:36 pm »
Quote
AuraTwilight: (The Sea of Zuruvan is the Sea of Time 1, 2) That's a really interesting idea on Lavos, and I admit that I like it quite a bit except for the fact that I like to think that the Lavos / Lavos Spawn you fight in CT are the only ones of their kind so there's not a possibility of the events recurring. I'll go over this in more detail in just a bit.

As for the Red Star, I have a few more quick points to bring up. This MAY just be a subtlety that's not specific in translation.

[Man]
   Red star in sky.
   See during daytime!

 [Woman]
   Red star grow strong!
   Bad sign...

The fact that it's visible during the daytime - can it still be seen at night? If not it suggests the gate theory a little more strongly. The main point outside of this is from two of our main characters - Lucca and Robo. They both reach a similiar conclusion - It appears that the immense energy that Lavos radiates alters time and creates Gates. This would (likely) mean that if there WERE more than one full grown Lavoid, it would also cause distortions in time. If in fact it were born/created and it's power continued to grow and distort time into the first Gate (the Red Star) until it actually ripped out of it's own time and fell. This also suggests the fact that the Lavos that fell was full grown upon impact. Unless the Lavos Spawn continue to grow and advance through their travels through space (to the point where upon impact they are already capapble of distorting reality), Lavos was likely the only one of its kind.

I know what the Sea of Zurvan is, but it's pretty much a metaphor for Idealism/Paradise/Eden/so on and so forth in Schala's speech. As for the man's quote, he says "Can be seen at day" Because even though it's a STAR, it's visible in the daytime unlike other stars in the sky. It's really that simple. It's probably visible 24/7. as for Lucca and Robo, they actually theorize that an Entity other than Lavos has been making Gates, and Lavos has only demonstrated two occassions of creating Gates, both of which were black. And even still they can be argued against as being made by someone else.

Magus22

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #18 on: July 09, 2006, 04:04:10 pm »
True.

Aside from any star, a super nova explosion can be seen at any time during the day. It's just a bright light.

Chrono'99

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2006, 04:16:33 pm »
Which leads us to another question: why was Lavos glowing red?

grey_the_angel

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2006, 04:18:10 pm »
Which leads us to another question: why was Lavos glowing red?
cause... red's awesome?

Magus22

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2006, 04:45:14 pm »
Which leads us to another question: why was Lavos glowing red?

There's no friction in space. We can rule that out. Maybe Lavos encased himself in some sort of protection force field to repel stellar space debris/dust.

Your question is great Chrono99. I have no clue. :?

Zaperking

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2006, 06:39:37 pm »
Maybe it was done for graphical purposes. Obviously, a red star would be more omnious than a normal looking star. That's why Azala had the emphasis "Stain the earth RED". The truth would be fire and explosions would take place once he landed, and I guess most fires are red O.o

Other than that, no clue.

Sentenal

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #23 on: July 10, 2006, 12:45:31 am »
Eh, maybe Lavos had a cloud of gas around it.  Maybe it was red then.  Who knows?

Lavos hit the planet hard enough to cause an ice age.  Lavos sucking on the planet's energy wouldn't cause it to freeze over.  Just look at 2300ad.  World sucked practically dry, and it's not frozen over near like the ice age.  Though, in 2300, there is a bit of ice around, but that is more a result of the sky being darkened from Lavos erupting and destoying everything, which would have thrown alot of dust into the atomsphere.

Zaperking

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #24 on: July 10, 2006, 03:20:09 am »
Eh, maybe Lavos had a cloud of gas around it.  Maybe it was red then.  Who knows?

Lavos hit the planet hard enough to cause an ice age.  Lavos sucking on the planet's energy wouldn't cause it to freeze over.  Just look at 2300ad.  World sucked practically dry, and it's not frozen over near like the ice age.  Though, in 2300, there is a bit of ice around, but that is more a result of the sky being darkened from Lavos erupting and destoying everything, which would have thrown alot of dust into the atomsphere.

Note that the planet is really windy, the water is dark and disgusting. But yes, it is very dusty.

Magus068

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2006, 11:06:02 am »
Eh, maybe Lavos had a cloud of gas around it.  Maybe it was red then.  Who knows?

Lavos hit the planet hard enough to cause an ice age.  Lavos sucking on the planet's energy wouldn't cause it to freeze over.  Just look at 2300ad.  World sucked practically dry, and it's not frozen over near like the ice age.  Though, in 2300, there is a bit of ice around, but that is more a result of the sky being darkened from Lavos erupting and destoying everything, which would have thrown alot of dust into the atomsphere.

Well it's more than enough. You see, the time to recover from the Ice Age is less than 500,000 years. Maybe the earth was cover with some of gas that created a long lasting greenhouse effect. Dust isn't enough to cause such effect.

Zaperking

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #26 on: July 14, 2006, 11:37:00 am »
Dust in the atmosphere (if enough) can be very serious. Because of Krakatoa, the temperature around the world dropped 3 degrees lower than normal for about 2 years.

Though, from the size of the impact of Lavos, I'd doubt that that much dust would have truely caused the ice age. The reason why the K-T meteor was so effective was because the blast sent shockwaves and a dust cloud and kinetic wave away from the crator, which made more dust go into the air, and also that same blast wave killed even more dinosaurs.

Because no one in Ioka was hurt, or there was no dust cloud over the city etc, and even Crono and co didn't get covered in dust, then obviously it didn't happen to that degree. Since the Reptites Castle was pushed underground, the land it was on may have been evaporated, by the castle obviously withstood the pressure.

Also, I always got the impression that Lavos' appearance and his "going fast into the earth" ment that he was already inside it, gathering energy. That would also explain the reason why the Iokan decided to say that "there is no more sweet water". Why isn't there? Because if the sweet water revives strength and stuff, and Lavos is stealing that strength from the planet, then the planet surely can't let any more of that sweet water continue flowing.

Matt Shadows

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #27 on: July 14, 2006, 11:41:29 am »
Damn, you made me read all of that. Very interesting. No, really that was "something to read"

Chrono'99

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #28 on: July 14, 2006, 12:02:35 pm »
Wow, it's quite particular to read all this post and then read a post by Matt.

Magus068

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Re: Lavos' Impact
« Reply #29 on: July 14, 2006, 11:44:18 pm »
If the dust contains huge amount sulfur & mixes with the Earth's atmosphere it will certainly create a greenhouse effect. Like you said, it's only a localize impact & it didn't create much damage therefore it couldn't stir enough dust to cover the entire Earth. If Lavos's impact hits a large vein of sulfur, it'll cause serious damage to the Earth's atmosphere & its environment by producing acid rain & prevented sun's heat from entering the Earth.