Author Topic: Real World Influences  (Read 46116 times)

Radical_Dreamer

  • Entity
  • Zurvan Surfer (+2500)
  • *
  • Posts: 2778
    • View Profile
    • The Chrono Compendium
Real World Influences
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2005, 09:02:04 pm »
Ozzie, Flea and Slash come from rock musicians. Ozzy Osbourne from Black Sabbath, Flea from Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Slash from Guns 'n' Roses.

Kassad

  • Iokan (+1)
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Real World Influences
« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2005, 11:03:37 am »
Quote
=Van, Goh

Van Gogh was a reputable French painter.


Actually, Van Gogh was Dutch but he did live in France during the last years of his life.

V_Translanka

  • Interim Global Moderator
  • Arbiter (+8000)
  • *
  • Posts: 8340
  • Destroyer of Worlds
    • View Profile
    • http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/v_translanka/
Real World Influences
« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2005, 09:35:38 pm »
Vinegar (ビネガー) (Ozzie)

Mayonnaise (マヨネイ) (Flea)

Soy Sauce (ソイソー) (Slash)

Radical Dreamer

  • Porrean (+50)
  • *
  • Posts: 85
  • Radical Dreamer
    • View Profile
Re: Real World Influences
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2005, 02:48:17 pm »
Quote from: ZeaLitY

Dead Sea =
Sea in Middle East known for its large salt deposits and lack of substantial flora/fauna as a result.


Allow me to add a bit.

The 'Dead Sea' is located in Israel.
It's the lowest place on Earth (!).

In Hebrew, that place is called - 'Yam Hamelach', meanning - 'Sea of Salt'.

Another name for it is 'Yam Hamavet' which means 'The Dead Sea'.
This is because the salt levels in the water is so high that nothing can live in the water (there are no fish in there).

Salvadeiro

  • Enlightened One (+200)
  • *
  • Posts: 243
    • View Profile
Real World Influences
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2005, 10:48:37 pm »
anything can float in the water too... I recall being thrown into the water, and me being terrified of the water at an early age (i was probably six) i floated without even touching the ground (but then again...i was like 3 feet tall)

Daniel Krispin

  • Guest
Real World Influences
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2005, 06:00:16 am »
On this topic, I just today spent an hour or two (maybe more) researching the origins of the name Magus - that sort of etymology is actually quite interesting to me, actually. Anyway, I noticed on the Chrono Shock forums that one of the theories put forward was that it was a Chaldean name, and thus would originally be pronounced as the plural is, with a j (ie. Mah-jus.) However, from what I have found (and I have attempted to vary my sources beyond the wiki-pedia sites, as the reliability of those is questionable), that is not the case. Most of this is known, I just figured I would reiterate more conclusively.

Firstly, proving my suspicions correct, the name is not Chaldean. The Chaldeans were a group living around the area of Ur (if anyone knows were this is, that is; it is in mid-Iraq nowadays, some ways south of Baghdad.) The term 'Magi', however, has something of a different origin. It comes to us directly from Latin, wherein the word Magus is used to denote a wise man or even sorcerer. In this context, the true pronounciation is Mah-gus. I would also wager, with reliable surity, that Magi would then in Latin be Mahg-ee, even as angelus is ahn-gel-uhs, with a harsh g. However, in Ecclesiastical, that is, Church Latin, the pronounciation of this g becomes a j, thus yielding our modern 'ain-jel'. A similar thing, I believe, occured to Magi, and it became 'Mah-jai'. I am not certain why Magus did not suffer the same fate, yet it appears to remain in common speech similar to the old Latin, save for the a, which is now an 'ay', rather than a short 'ah'.

Now let us take another step backward.

Just like the example of 'angel', magus comes from the Greek/Hellenic vocabulary (where angel is aggelos, the gg being pronounced ng.) Magus here is written as Magos, with the o being pronounced as the u in but - there are different versions, however, depending on the part of speech it is, such as Magous, and Magou, but they are mostly incidental. Of interest, however, is that Magos is not directly a word for sorcerer or magic. Tekhnay, or skill, is the more indigenous word. Magos does, however, figure into at least one other word meaning magician, and that is Magikos.

Anyway, here things become a little shaky.

Magos is not a native Hellenic word. It is rather Persian. Now, the confusion between Persian and Chaldean is understandable, as the Chaldeans lived in an area that was at a time occupied by the Medo Persian Empire. But natively, the Persians live south west of the area, and are about as far east a people as one can get without being on the doorstep of India. Now, the Persians and Medes came to power in succession to the Neo Babylonians, in the mid 500s BC. The historian Herodotus (the first historian, actually) speaks of a certain Median tribe or caste (here seems to be a hazy area for me, as different sources speak of it differently), a member of whom he termed a Magos (or, in English, Magian.) This word, according to one site (and a wiki-pedia one, so I approach it with caution) comes from Magupati, a Persian word, and certain roots denoting strength. One says that magus actually, in origin, means 'mighty one'. Also said is:
The Persian word is a u-stem adjective from an Indo-Iranian root *magh "powerful, rich" also continued in Sanskrit magha "gift, wealth", magha-vant "generous" (a name of Indra).
And, far, far more reliable than these wiki sites, the Oxford Dictionary speaks of it as coming from magu-s, which I take to mean that the s is an addition to a root-word. By this, I think that the original Persian pronounciation did indeed use the harsher g sound rather than the j.

But whatever it may mean, they came to be known as priests and astrologers, hence the Hellenes usage of it to denote magicans, whence the Latins and later we inherit it. And it can then be, with near final conclusivity, that the proper, if not common, pronounciation of Magus is Mah-gus.

Oh, and as for the sources I used in coming to this conclusion...
The pronounciation of Greek/Hellenic and Latin I knew so did not look up, but the history of the word I did not, and looked at several places, the chief of these being:
(A fully reliable site, as it is the online version of a respected Greek Lexicon.):
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?layout.reflang=greek;layout.refembed=2;layout.refwordcount=1;layout.reflookup=%2Ama%2Fgou;doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3D%2364449
(A wiki-based site):
http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/List-of-English-words-of-Persian-origin
(and wikipedia itself):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magi

So you may look for yourself. None of these things are exceptionally hard to find, save maybe for the Lexicon site (that is not one of those commonly known ones, though it is one of my favourite sites on the internet.)

LadyLife

  • Earthbound (+15)
  • *
  • Posts: 19
  • Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war.
    • View Profile
Real World Influences
« Reply #21 on: June 26, 2005, 03:10:05 pm »
Quote from: ZeaLitY
Chrono'99: About the 3 gurus giving Chrono's party 3 gifts like the Mages, I always though these 3 gifts were more in relation with the japanese mythology :
the japanese Emperor got 3 gifts from the gods :
- a sword taken from a devil's body
- a magical jewel (time egg?)
- a mirror with 8 faces (ok there is only 7 time periods in CT but...)


The time periods that Crono and co. were capable of traveling to were as follows:
- 65,000,000 BC
- 12,000 BC
- 600 AD
- 1000 AD
- 1999 AD
- 2300 AD
- The end of time.

And also, with the addition of the Fiona sidequest, back to Lucca's childhood. I'm not sure if it was said what year that was, but it was accessable.

Of course, if you feel more comfortable not including it, just cause there is no considerable time spent there (a fragment of one night isn't much, I'll admit), you could always think about it this way. The time periods Chrono and co. were able to travel to were the ones in which they could take actions to change major events. That is also so in 1020 AD, the time period that Chrono Cross takes place in. The group made great effort to, for the most part, create a better outcome.

V_Translanka

  • Interim Global Moderator
  • Arbiter (+8000)
  • *
  • Posts: 8340
  • Destroyer of Worlds
    • View Profile
    • http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/v_translanka/
Real World Influences
« Reply #22 on: June 26, 2005, 06:34:02 pm »
I don't think that's the point exactly, because it's not really the gurus that give Lucca access to her childhood...The 7 time periods are accessable through the Epoch...Although I think the jewel makes more sense as The Pendant...So perhaps the Time Egg could count as the 8th "face"...

LadyLife

  • Earthbound (+15)
  • *
  • Posts: 19
  • Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war.
    • View Profile
Real World Influences
« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2005, 01:03:41 pm »
Quote from: V_Translanka
I don't think that's the point exactly, because it's not really the gurus that give Lucca access to her childhood...The 7 time periods are accessable through the Epoch...Although I think the jewel makes more sense as The Pendant...So perhaps the Time Egg could count as the 8th "face"...


And in reply, I quote the part from my previous post that I presume you didn't read.

Quote
Of course, if you feel more comfortable not including it, just cause there is no considerable time spent there (a fragment of one night isn't much, I'll admit), you could always think about it this way. The time periods Chrono and co. were able to travel to were the ones in which they could take actions to change major events. That is also so in 1020 AD, the time period that Chrono Cross takes place in. The group made great effort to, for the most part, create a better outcome.

V_Translanka

  • Interim Global Moderator
  • Arbiter (+8000)
  • *
  • Posts: 8340
  • Destroyer of Worlds
    • View Profile
    • http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/v_translanka/
Real World Influences
« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2005, 01:03:16 am »
I was specifying why I didn't think it should be included...Sorry, but my 'comfort' level didn't really factor into it...And the Chrono Cross period isn't really time traveled to...But I dunno, maybe you could explain your opinion on that...?

Daniel Krispin

  • Guest
Real World Influences
« Reply #25 on: June 28, 2005, 01:49:02 am »
Nobody finds my treatise on the name Magus interesting, eh?

Radical_Dreamer

  • Entity
  • Zurvan Surfer (+2500)
  • *
  • Posts: 2778
    • View Profile
    • The Chrono Compendium
Real World Influences
« Reply #26 on: June 28, 2005, 02:58:35 am »
Quote from: Daniel Krispin
Nobody finds my treatise on the name Magus interesting, eh?


When my work weeks goes down from the current 72 hours to a more managable 40, I'll take a look.

Daniel Krispin

  • Guest
Real World Influences
« Reply #27 on: June 28, 2005, 03:05:47 am »
Quote from: Radical_Dreamer
Quote from: Daniel Krispin
Nobody finds my treatise on the name Magus interesting, eh?


When my work weeks goes down from the current 72 hours to a more managable 40, I'll take a look.


Ai! That must be most difficulty, indeed!

Hadriel

  • Dimension Crosser (+1000)
  • *
  • Posts: 1044
    • View Profile
Real World Influences
« Reply #28 on: June 28, 2005, 05:43:57 am »
I don't usually research into names unless I have to.  But if I ever need a reference for the name, I'll know just where to look.   8)

YbrikMetaknight

  • Squaretable Knight (+400)
  • *
  • Posts: 462
  • I strike fast and disappear for years at a time.
    • View Profile
    • Chrono Compendium
Real World Influences
« Reply #29 on: June 28, 2005, 02:40:03 pm »
If I ever get time, Daniel Krispin, I may add all or some of that to my Magus article. Quite interesting, though I do not have time at the moment to read the whole thing.