Author Topic: Social Reforms -- Change The World With Style!  (Read 1867 times)

tushantin

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Re: Social Reforms -- Change The World With Style!
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2011, 02:53:52 am »
I can't seem to view Yahoo Videos, Faust, although I think I know what you're trying to show me. That's no surprise to me. Here's a different link, though with the same idea (from ActionAid UK).

Looking at it again I'm actually glad I live in a much more privileged, blissful and educated culture where these cases are incredibly minimal. Most of the sex selection cases are, unsurprisingly, the direct consequences of Dowry. This situation usually drives families into desperation, especially in orthodox and poorer areas, and they end up abandoning girls entirely. A gender which gets them more "profit" is considered a fortune. However, while dowry has been outlawed the social pressure still retains among the people (mostly because a family that has been "shamed" with its association with law will considered as outcasts). But as the dude in the video says, corrective law alone cannot help curb this offense -- there is a great need for a social movement to raise awareness, and there is a great need to help better the status of women.

As I mentioned before, there are two kinds of India that reside in my nation, and this one is the ugly, backward majority (I say "backwards" because they remain in the past and can't seem to help elevate themselves to the national ideal we've set for ourselves), and to be fair the majority of these cases occur from areas of lower literacy rates. I've even explored the state of Maharashtra further and found, based on sectoral division, that the eastern parts are in the shadows of industrial influence which results in financial drops (by which case, the drops would result in further dowry, and hence more sex selection cases).

Here's a literacy range map of the past decade: Places like Maharashtra, Goa and Kerala still triumph, and correlate directly with their sex ratio, while states like Rajasthan, Bihar and Andhra Pradesh are the worst offenders of both sex selection and literacy (although, with the Women's Rights bill, Andhra Pradesh does fair better than Rajashthan and Bihar in terms of, well, women's rights). Punjab seems to have lifted itself well in the last decade, but even then...

THIS!

....

The battle against the backward classes is still on. Here's a good blog worth some people's time.

I view it as an example of why campaigning for change at the cultural level is important. For one thing, it seems a bedrock cultural change has to go hand-in-hand with legal changes, because otherwise a corrective law might not even be seen as something to be enforced. Then again, this is a complex battle to wage in the first place: mothers must have autonomy over whether they carry their babies to term after all.
Indeed. Problem is, in those areas, they just don't have the choice. Desperation and destitution can drive societies into insanity. They need a rope of some kind to pull through, and if the Government is too lazy sitting on its ass all day then it's up to us commoners: if it disgusts us so much then why not go about bringing change ourselves?

That said, law usually follows with cultural traction, not the other way around, so indeed they have to go about hand-in-hand.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2011, 02:57:51 am by tushantin »

tushantin

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Re: Social Reforms -- Change The World With Style!
« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2011, 01:11:38 pm »
Was gonna post this at the "WTF check this link out" thread, then perhaps at the "Amusement" thread, but realized that this was probably the best place. This is also something ZeaLitY would be interested in taking a look. These are merely what I found, but I must say that crowd-sourcing brings excellent government-public integration.

I'll try to go through it chronologically:

1) In Iceland, constitutions are written on Facebook:
http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/14/in-iceland-constitutions-are-written-on-facebook/

Quote from: Engadget
Ah, Iceland -- home to the Blue Lagoon, Sigur Rós and, most recently, crowdsourced constitutionalism. With its economy still reeling from the 2009 financial crisis, the country has begun hammering away at a brand new constitution, and is asking its online citizenry for help. The draft is being prepared by a democratically elected, 25-member council, but any Icelanders with an internet connection can add their own suggestions, engage in online debates, or follow the proceedings in real-time on Facebook. All suggestions are moderated to weed out the really dumb ones ("FEWER VOLCANOES"), and those approved by the board will be directly added to the draft, due to be completed at the end of this month. It's a fascinating social experiment, but one that could probably only happen in a place where nearly 90 percent of all households have a broadband connection, two-thirds of the entire population is on Facebook -- meaning their politicians are always within poke's reach.

Quote from: Comments
1) Governments are the best institutions to benefit from crowdsourcing. Redefining the constitution may seem like a bit of a stretch when you think of how younger generations are leaning more towards technocracy then democracy but it still seems like an interesting experiment. I recently wrote an article on crowdsourcing, it might be an interesting read: http://michael.moreyne.co/2011/07/10/crowd-sourcing-and-crowd-funding/

2) Talk about transparency. Something we don't have here because then we would see how all the interest groups make sure that the loopholes stay wide and open.

2) Iceland's crowdsourced constitution submitted for approval, Nyan Cat takes flight over Reykjavik:
http://www.engadget.com/2011/07/31/icelands-crowdsourced-constitution-submitted-for-approval-nyan/
Link 2 (shortened)

Quote from: Engadget
A committee of 25 Icelanders submitted the first draft of a rewritten constitution to the country's parliamentary speaker Friday, and despite our recommendations, Rebecca Black was conspicuously absent from the proceedings. The democratic experiment bravely asked citizens to log on to Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, and Twitter to engage with the committee in a discussion about the nation's future. While the project's Facebook page played host to pleads for free ice cream and more volcanoes, the constitution's creators managed to stay on task, focusing on issues of decentralization and transparency in government. The draft is slated for review beginning October 1st.

Quote from: Comments
1) America has a very different view of what a constitution is and quite frankly what government is.  It's the nature of the country and the people:  left and right, red and blue, right and wrong, America does not do well with ambiguity, nor the idea of a collective society being something desirable.  In America you hardly ever hear the word civil servant because, as a people, they do not believe this to be natural.  America believes that people make the best decisions they can as individuals and that in aggregate the result is representative.  It's an adversarial concept that so long as different branches of government are at cross purposes they will struggle and evolve and keep each other in check.  And as a result the USA constitution is narrow in scope and far more specific than Iceland would ever want.

Iceland, as the constitution is written, demands a strong civil service.  They have a number of very prominent people in positions of power whom must commit to neutrality and to work in the interests of the public good.  Since Americans are weary of concept, and perhaps rightly so given their own and world history, such positions could never exist there.  

I think it's very interesting that in America the idea of a crowd sourced constitution is unfathomable, while in Iceland it's the exact opposite.  Size of the country is part of it, history another.  

From a technology side of things I will say the Iceland constitution seeks privacy while in the USA a bill where were every single IP address you visit would be recorded is made relatively easy to get is being passed.  You would expect that in a country who crowd sources their constitution.  I think it's a little sad this is not even on the radar for most Americans where privacy is given away for a free copy of Angry Birds.


2) If someone developed a keyword algorithm, I see no reason why this wouldn't work in America.  People who are bashing this are probably the same people who vote their candidates into office based on hair-do's and posture instead of issues, political acumen, and voting record.

Wikipedia seems to work just fine with millions of people collaborating.  I don't see how a crowd-sourced Constitution is such a stretch of the imagination, except to the political elite who rule with impunity nowadays and don't want to be bothered with things like accountability and transparency when they can just keep taking kickbacks from special interests.

On a side note, interesting link. Not sure about its accuracy: http://lawdelta.org/world/Main_Page

tushantin

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Re: Social Reforms -- Change The World With Style!
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2012, 04:37:54 pm »
"Be the change that you want to see in this world." -- Gandhi

In a world without Sherlock Holmes, the citizens should stand bravely, courageously, and watch each others' backs. Only then can we destroy injustice!

http://www.facebook.com/zerotolerancecampaign
http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/zero-tolerance-campaign.html
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-11-06/mumbai/30366166_1_zero-tolerance-amboli-murders
http://www.zerotolerance.org.uk/

And, to help your fellow brethren:
http://deviantcare.deviantart.com/

tushantin

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Re: Social Reforms -- Change The World With Style!
« Reply #33 on: May 06, 2012, 12:54:39 pm »
Satyameva Jayate (Truth Stands Invincible)

http://www.ndtvmovies.com/movie_story.aspx?section=Movies&Id=ENTEN20120202003&keyword=bollywood&subcatg=MOVIESINDIA&nid=206935

http://zeenews.india.com/entertainment/idiotbox/aamir-s-satyamev-jayate-review-truly-soul-stirring_110819.htm

http://ibnlive.in.com/news/satyamev-jayate-aamirs-tv-show-is-a-movement/255255-44-124.html

A lot of us rant that the public is too stupid and ignorant for not wanting to learn about the atrocities of the world. But this guy has no time to rant, because he's too busy doing what most of us simply can't. Do the impossible!

tushantin

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Problems of Stagnation -- Both in Religion, Philosophy and Science
« Reply #34 on: January 08, 2013, 12:43:07 pm »
Problems of Stagnation -- Both in Religion, Philosophy and Science

Look at this video:

[youtube]F0sszxXlzlY[/youtube]

You clearly begin to grow biased against the religious endorsements in school, even though you'd justify it for the sake of scientific curiosity. But how fair would the newer paradigm be compared to the previous one in the current system itself? Take a look at the next video:

[youtube]e9yUXVzs0Qw[/youtube]

The problem is neither of the "contents" of what we're actually being taught, but the "system" we're being taught in. We already know that both religion and science grew parallel from a single point, but eventually branched out into two separate entities in time, and for a good reason: Religion, being politicised, became stagnant and frictitious to human progress. What's worse is that modern science is also slowly enveloping this same mechanism of rigidity, at least in educational fields if not research, that hinder the growth of curiosity and perseverence.

The problem? Let's see if you can recognize these terms: "It is what it is, there's proof, so don't question it."

I'm not sure if I need to say anything beyond this. Now, it would sound fair for science to directly challenge religion with its innovative systems of acquiring knowledge, but we've also had several clusters of inconsistencies that actually made us revise entire paradigms to make way for a more accurate perspectives. Hell, I lost grades in last year's Psychology paper just because I had a more accurate paradigm available when the school was using an older one: The academy insisted (rigidly so) that the tongue actually has a "standard map" of where certain kinds of neurons interpret certain kinds of tastes, which I rejected because this theory had been disproven long ago, and people STILL seem to cling to it. The only reason I failed was because the schools function in the same way: "We have the proof, so don't question us", without the examiners considering even once that I may have an equal proportion of evidence too.

I call on the fallacies of cultural inconsistencies than the "content" we're being taught, whether Religious or Science. If we manage to fix the core of the problem, then creative thinking will pave a better path of progress for both the branches, and more efficiently so